Athabaska Tar Sands as A Source of Crude Oil.
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Athabaska Tar Sands as A Source of Crude Oil.

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Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

1

SeriesCanada. Mines Branch. Information circular -- 169
ContributionsMontgomery, D.S.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21900229M

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The Athabasca Oil Sands represent a form of oil deposit significantly more expensive to collect and refine than traditional oil deposits, with operators of extraction facilities being much more vulnerable to fluctuations in the oil price than those at traditional oil fields . The Athabasca oil sands (or tar sands) are large deposits of bitumen or extremely heavy crude oil, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada – roughly centred on the boomtown of Fort oil sands, hosted primarily in the McMurray Formation, consist of a mixture of crude bitumen (a semi-solid rock-like form of crude oil), silica sand, clay minerals, and water. The Athabasca Oil Sands is the only place where oil companies have found methods to make extraction cost-effective for Onshore shallow heavy using both in situ (drilling) and surface excavation (mining) methods. 2. Cost of Transportation. The total cost of transportation depends on if the crude oil can be cost-effectively shipped to a refinery.   Imports from Canada make up 19% of US supply, with half of this coming from oil sands. 6 mines produce , barrels of crude oil on a daily basis and a total of billion barrels of oil estimated to be contained in the sands; The oil sands consist of a mixture of crude .

  Some ponds are leaking into the Athabasca River, says Paul Belanger, a former oil sands worker and current co-chair of Keepers of the Athabasca, an organization of . The Alaska Oil Sands are Large deposits of bitumen or extremely heavy crude oil also called the Athabasca tar sands or the Alberta tar sands. It is located roughly center of boom town of Fort McMurray and was discovered in and started it production in Tar Sands, Athabasca River, Alberta, n.d. Source: Geological Survey of Canada/Library and Archives Canada, PA Drilling in search of a basement reservoir of oil is the initial focus of development in Alberta’s oil sands. One of those is Athabasca Oil Corp's Hangingstone project. It was originally conceived as a 80, bpd project, but instead will bring output to o bpd from the current 9, bpd.

Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, , Reserves of conventional crude oil and of oil sands bitumen. Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, , Reserves of coal, province of Alberta. Ball, M.W., , Athabaska oil sands; an apparent example of local origin of oil: AAPG Bulletin, v. 19, p. Introduction The Athabasca oil sands are the second largest producer of crude oil in the world, with a surface area of approximately square kilometres (Anderson, Giesy & Wiseman, ). The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board estimates that the oil sands contains approximately trillion. The Athabasca oil sands, also known as the Athabasca tar sands, are large deposits of bitumen or extremely heavy crude oil, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada – roughly centred on the boomtown of Fort McMurray. It is located in northeast Alberta, in the middle of the Athabasca oil sands, . The Athabasca oil sands in Alberta, Canada, are a very large source of bitumen, which can be upgraded to synthetic crude oil. Tar sandstone from California, United States Oil sands, tar sands, crude bitumen, or more technically bituminous sands, are a type of unconventional petroleum deposit.