Women in modern China.
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Women in modern China.

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Published by Mouton in The Hague, Paris .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • China.

Subjects:

  • Women -- China.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Classifications
LC ClassificationsHQ1737 .S6
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 264 p.
Number of Pages264
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5540462M
LC Control Number67018165

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Writing Women in Modern China is the first major anthology in English to highlight the contributions of women to modern literary culture with respect to the heated gender debates of early twentieth-century China. Featuring examples of fiction, drama, autobiography, essays, and poetry by eighteen writers, many of whom have been neglected by mainstream literary history, /5. Exploring the works of key women writers within their cultural, artistic and socio-political contexts, this book considers changes in the perception of women in early modern China. The sixteenth century brought rapid developments in technology, commerce and the publishing industry that saw women emerging in new roles as both consumers and Cited by: 1. Analyzing the protracted cultural debate in modern China over what and how women should write, this book focuses on two concepts of great importance in Chinese literary modernization - the new, liberated woman and the new, autonomous writing. The author argues that in many modernizing countries traditional constrictions of women became a focus Cited by:   Writing Women in Modern China is the first major anthology in English to highlight the contributions of women to modern literary culture with respect to the heated gender debates of early twentieth-century China. Featuring examples of fiction, drama, autobiography, essays, and poetry by eighteen writers, many of whom have been neglected by mainstream literary history, .

The Good Women of China (ISBN ) is a book published in The author, Xue Xinran, is a British-Chinese journalist who currently resides in London and writes for The Tyldesley translated this book from Chinese. The Good Women of China is primarily composed of interviews Xinran conducted during her time as a radio broadcaster in .   Her short stories provide a glimpse into a China on the cusp of modernization. “Chang’s stories are about men and women, especially women, who have no choice but to navigate the treacherous passage from the world of traditional China to the freedoms, ambitions, and dangers of modern life,” the New York Review of Books wrote.   The authors discuss the absence of women in the Confucian canonical tradition and examine the presence of women in politics, family, education, and art in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. What emerges is a concept of Confucianism that is dynamic instead of monolithic in shaping the cultures of East Asian societies.   The Famous, Feuding Siblings Who Helped Shape Modern China The Soong sisters, shown here in Shanghai in , embodied a new kind of Chinese woman: cosmopolitan, enlightened, liberated. Credit Author: Jiayang Fan.

Women and Writing in Modern China By Wendy Larson Stanford University Press, Read preview Overview Technomobility in China: Young Migrant Women and Mobile Phones By Cara Wallis New York University Press,   Amy D. Dooling is associate professor of Chinese at Connecticut College. She is the author of Women's Literary Feminism in Twentieth-Century China and the coeditor and co-translator (with Kristina Torgeson) of Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Literature by Chinese Women from the Early Twentieth Century. Women in Asia surveys the transformation in the status of women since in a diverse range of nations: Malaysia, China, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, India, Taiwan, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Korea, Japan, and Burma. Using these thirteen national case studies the book presents new arguments about being women, being Asian, and being modern in contemporary Asia. The Communist revolution promised Chinese women an end to thousands of years of subjugation, an equality with men in all matters legal, political, social, and economic. This book examines the extent to which this promise has been kept. Based on nearly a year of field research and interviews with over women in six widely separated rural and urban areas, it gives us .